The Phrase

A „Catch-22“ is „a problematic situation for which the only solution is denied by a circumstance inherent in the problem …“[Source]

Catch-22 the novel

Catch-22 is a satirical novel by American author Joseph Heller. He began writing it in 1953; the novel was first published in 1961. It is frequently cited as one of the greatest literary works of the twentieth century.[1] It uses a distinctive non-chronological third-person omniscient narration, describing events from the points of view of different characters. The separate storylines are out of sequence so the timeline develops along with the plot. © wikipedia

Catch-22 the phrase

Catch-22 starts as a set of paradoxical requirements whereby airmen mentally unfit to fly did not have to do so, but could not actually be excused. By the end of the novel it is invoked as the explanation for many unreasonable restrictions. The phrase „Catch-22“ has since entered the English language, referring to a type of unsolvable logic puzzle sometimes called a double bind.[2] According to the novel, people who were crazy were not obliged to fly missions, but anyone who applied to stop flying was showing a rational concern for his safety and was, therefore, sane and had to fly. © wikipedia